Research Warns of Health Risks Associated With Drinking Alcohol on Airplanes

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Research Warns of Health Risks , Associated With Drinking , Alcohol on Airplanes.
Fox News reports that travelers may want
to reconsider drinking on their next flight
before trying to get some mid-air sleep. .
According to a new study published in
'Thorax,' consuming alcohol before sleeping
on a plane could result in lowered blood
oxygen levels and an increased heart rate.
Experts warn that the cabin of a plane
already has less oxygen in the air than
we normally breathe. Alcohol and sleep
only exacerbate this problem.
Experts warn that the cabin of a plane
already has less oxygen in the air than
we normally breathe. Alcohol and sleep
only exacerbate this problem.
The study, led by the Department of Sleep
and Human Factors Research at the German
Aerospace Center, found an increased
risk for people with preexisting conditions.
Passengers with cardiopulmonary
diseases have an increased risk
of aggravation of symptoms
due to the decreased cabin
pressure at cruising altitude,
which is amplified during sleep, Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine
at NYU Langone Medical Center, via Fox News.
Alcohol, which is often consumed
on board, has similar effects, but
hypobaric hypoxia-induced changes
are usually more pronounced, Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine
at NYU Langone Medical Center, via Fox News.
According to the team, this is the first study to look at
the combined impact of low oxygen concentration
at high altitudes and consuming alcohol before sleep.
Those [factors] are synergistic
with each other, leading to
increased heart rate and likely
increased heart pressure and risks,
even in young, healthy individuals, Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine
at NYU Langone Medical Center, via Fox News.
Dr. Adam Scioli, chief medical officer at Caron Treatment
Centers in Pennsylvania, suggests the study highlights
the need to stay well-hydrated when flying. .
This can be exacerbated by
the fact that many people don’t
drink enough water before they fly,
which causes dehydration —
again increasing the likelihood
of negative impact on their heart, Dr. Adam Scioli, chief medical officer at Caron
Treatment Centers in Pennsylvania, via Fox News

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