Study Suggests Horticulture Therapy Could Help Fight Depression

3 months ago
Study Suggests , Horticulture Therapy , Could Help Fight Depression.
PsyPost reports that a study suggests
that horticulture therapy may be effective at
reducing depression symptoms in older adults.
PsyPost reports that a study suggests
that horticulture therapy may be effective at
reducing depression symptoms in older adults.
The study was published in
the journal 'Frontiers in Public Health.'.
Horticulture therapy is an approach that focuses on plants,
gardens and gardening activities to improve an
individual's physical, mental or emotional well-being.
According to a systematic review of available research,
the greatest benefits were found for individuals in
care-providing settings who participated in the therapy
for 4 to 8 weeks.
PsyPost reports that while pharmacological interventions have
long been the primary method of treatment for depression,
side-effects have driven a search for alternatives.
PsyPost reports that while pharmacological interventions have
long been the primary method of treatment for depression,
side-effects have driven a search for alternatives.
According to the team's research, studies that
produced the greatest effects were those with
participants that took part in the process of planting.
In terms of the environment
settings, care-providing settings
were demonstrated to produce
higher therapeutic effects, Study authors, via PsyPost.
Participatory activities [where study
participants participate in planting
or gardening activities] produced
greater outcomes than observational
activities [in which participants
just walked through gardens], Study authors, via PsyPost.
Participatory activities [where study
participants participate in planting
or gardening activities] produced
greater outcomes than observational
activities [in which participants
just walked through gardens], Study authors, via PsyPost.
In terms of the duration of the interventions,
a course of 4–8 weeks of horticultural
therapy had better outcomes, Study authors, via PsyPost.
PsyPost reports that the study addresses the growing
scientific knowledge of how horticulture therapy
can help to combat the symptoms of depression.

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