3 months ago

The new Porsche 911 GT3 RS Track driving

AutoMotions
AutoMotions
The basis for a significant performance boost is the concept of a central radiator – an idea that was first used in the Le Mans class-winning 911 RSR and subsequently in the 911 GT3 R. Instead of the three-radiator layout seen in previous cars, the new 911 GT3 RS relies on a large, angled centre radiator in the car’s nose, positioned where the luggage compartment is located on other 911 models. This has made it possible to use the space freed up on the sides to integrate active aerodynamic elements.

Continuously adjustable wing elements in the front and on the two-part rear wing, in combination with a number of other aerodynamic measures, provide 409 kg of total downforce at 200 km/h. This means that the new 911 GT3 RS generates twice as much downforce as its 991.2-generation predecessor and three times as much as a current 911 GT3. At 285 km/h, total downforce is 860 kg.

A drag reduction system (DRS) is fitted in a production Porsche for the first time. To achieve low drag and higher speeds on straight sections of the track, the DRS allows the wings to be flattened out at the push of a button, within a specific operating range. The airbrake function is activated during emergency braking at high speeds: the wing elements at the front and rear are set to maximum, creating an aerodynamic deceleration effect that significantly supports the wheel brakes.

The look of the new 911 GT3 RS is characterised by the large number of functional aerodynamic elements. The most prominent feature of the GT sports car is the swan-neck-supported rear wing, which is significantly larger in all dimensions. The rear wing consists of a fixed main wing and an upper, hydraulically adjustable wing element.

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