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4 months ago

Experts Say COVID-19 Emergency Could Come to an End in 2022

Wibbitz Top Stories
Wibbitz Top Stories
Experts Say
COVID-19 Emergency , Could Come to an End in 2022.
COVID-19 may be with us forever at this point, but health officials say society as a whole could put an end to coronavirus as a
public health emergency in 2022.
We won’t end the virus this year, we won’t ever end the virus — what we can end is the public health emergency. , Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Health Organizations
Health Emergencies Program, via CNBC.
The world is weary after nearly three years
of the COVID-19 onslaught.
It’s the death, it’s the hospitalizations, it’s the disruptions that cause the tragedy, not the virus. The virus is a vehicle. , Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Health Organizations
Health Emergencies Program, via CNBC.
Disparate access to vaccines and health care has prolonged the pandemic. .
Officials say addressing societal inequities could result in a turning point in the pandemic.
What we need to do is get to low levels of disease incidence
with maximum vaccination of
our populations where
no one has to die. , Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Health Organizations
Health Emergencies Program, via CNBC.
What we need to do is get to low levels of disease incidence
with maximum vaccination of
our populations where
no one has to die. , Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Health Organizations
Health Emergencies Program, via CNBC.
The lack of availability of coronavirus vaccines in the least wealthy nations of the world is a barrier to progress in ending the pandemic, officials say.
As many wealthy nations now implement blanket booster dose programs, the gap of vaccine inequity widens.
Blanket booster programs are likely to prolong the pandemic, rather than ending it, Tedros Adhanom, Director-General of the World Health Organization, via CNN.
... by diverting supply to countries that already have high levels
of vaccination coverage, giving
the virus more opportunity
to spread and mutate. , Tedros Adhanom, Director-General of the World Health Organization, via CNN

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